Scoundrel Know-How

17/11/11 6:00 AM

NOTE: This post is part of my ongoing series called “What Really Happened While I Was Writing What Happened in Granite Creek.” Occasionally, some of these posts will contain spoilers. I’d rate this one “medium” level, so advance at your own risk. (The perfect solution, of course, would be to read What Happened in Granite Creek and then come back to this post. See what I did there? 😉 )

When I wrote the short story, “Support Our Troops,” I had no idea that the full-blown novel — What Happened in Granite Creek — would evolve into a book filled with suspense/mystery. That’s the fun thing about writing: those times when the story takes over and leads your imagination down the road not taken.

This new road, however, required me to stop and research certain things, like guns and dead bodies and police procedure.

  • I also talked to David Studley with the Crime Scene Services unit of the Framingham Police Department, which is my hometown PD.
  • In my Internet travels, I also came across this: Writers’ Police Academy, where writers gather for a weekend of training in all things police related. I didn’t go, but it’s cool to know something like this exists in case I ever need it.

Have you ever read a book where you were awed by the amount of research that went into it? Share in the comments.

And if you share this post on Twitter, remember to use the hashtag #WHIGC.

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2 Comments on “Scoundrel Know-How”

  1. Steve T Says:

    I think the best fiction writer working today is Michael Chabon (present company excluded, of course). In The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, he creates detailed World War II scenes, takes us through the Golden Age of Comic Books in the ’40s and ’50s and even integrates Jewish folklore (The Golem of Prague). Either he’s a genius or he spent a good amount of time researching these and other subjects of his book.

  2. Robyn Says:

    @Steve — No worries…I’m definitely not in Chabon’s company. Good points. Thanks for commenting!